CNT in the News

Does South Florida Lead Nation In Gap Between Wages and Housing?

Politifact Florida, in partnership with the Tampa Bay Times & Miami Herald | March 24, 2017

South Florida’s housing market spans the gamut of tony gated oceanfront mansions for millionaires and some downtrodden neighborhoods. That’s not unusual for a major urban area. But is it worse in South Florida than elsewhere in the nation? Habitat for Humanity painted a stark picture about the cost of housing in South Florida in a press release announcing that President Donald Trump’s Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, retired Dr. Ben Carson, will visit the site of a future affordable housing development in Broward County on March 24. The release included information from the Center for Neighborhood Technology and The Center for Housing Policy’s Losing Ground: The Struggle of Moderate-Income Households to Afford the Rising Costs of Housing and Transportation. The report found that housing and transportation costs rose faster than income nationally, although the disparity was greater in some metro areas than others. And South Florida topped that list.

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Chicago Jumps in Technology Innovation Rankings

WTTW Chicago Tonight | March 21, 2017

Chicago made significant strides as a technology innovation hub in the eyes of industry leaders over the last year, according to KPMG's 2017 Global Technology Innovation Survey.  "There's been a big effort in the last five years or so to develop technology ecosystems," said Erin Grossi, CEO of the nonprofit Center for Neighborhood Technology.  

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EPA Cuts "Matter of Life and Death" for Chicago Communities

WTTW Chicago Tonight | March 21, 2017

For more than 20 years, a modest amount of federal grant money has helped Chicago communities reduce asthma rates linked to secondhand smoke, protect students from harmful cleaning chemicals and educate low-income residents about lead poisoning. Such initiatives, which aim to protect residents of minority and low-income communities, are on the chopping block under President Donald Trump's proposed federal budget, which calls for a 31-percent cut to the Environmental Protection Agency. Recently, the Center for Neighborhood Technology obtained EPA funding to design and test infrastructure in Chatham to improve storm water management and reduce flooding and water pollution.

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The Bus Stops Here: For Affordable Housing

Madison Commons | March 3, 2017

The Madison Area Bus Advocates (Wisconsin) use CNT's research to help in their argument that "to invest in public transportation is to invest in affordable housing." The group cites CNT's years of research that finds traditional measure of the housing cost burden is inadequate, that it is more realistic to consider housing and transportation costs together. Instead of using 30 percent of household income to identify whether the household is ‘cost burdened,’ it is better to use a combined figure of 45-48% for the cost of both housing and transportation combined.  It has concluded that for Madison, housing affordability could be enhanced with bus rapid transit and transit-oriented developments. 

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Massachusetts Parking Study Inspired by CNT Research Reveals 25% of Spaces Go Unused

The Chelsea Record | March 3, 2017

The Massachusetts-based Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) study called the Metro Boston Perfect Fit Parking Initiative showed that nearly 25% of parking spaces in apartment buildings are not being used. The study began when MAPC looked at studies done by CNT in Seattle, Chicago, and Washington, D.C. The CNT studies focused on new apartment buildings and parking requirements put on them--finding that many of the required spaces constructed weren't being used.  Those findings sparked MAPC to conduct the study in February, honing in on apartment developments in five Boston-area communities.The findings align with CNT's, and bring about questions of costs, fairness, and land use. 

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Transit-Oriented Development Produces Affordable Living Opportunities

Chicago Sun-Times | February 8, 2017

One way City Hall can help residents caught in the cross-hairs of gentrification is through transit-oriented development. This is a creative and far-sighted effort to build a greater number of living units near transportation hubs than would be normally be allowed. By requiring a large number of affordable units in the new construction, aldermen are helping longtime residents stay in their neighborhoods.Transit-oriented development also works naturally to produce more affordable living opportunities in a city. Because the building typically is located right next to a CTA L stop or Metra station, residents are less likely to need a car. And the building can be designed with fewer parking spaces, bringing down the cost.Jacky Grimshaw, Vice President of Government Affairs for the Center for Neighborhood Technology (CNT), calls it “equitable transit-oriented development.”

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