Publication Library

CNT
What would a RainReady Midlothian look like? It would be a community where residents and businesses benefit from flood relief in a way that also brings neighborhood beautification, retail activity, jobs, recreation, and habitat conservation. In order to better understand Midlothian’s flood risk, the Center for Neighborhood Technology, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Floodlothian Midlothian, and the Village of Midlothian joined together in January 2015. Throughout 2015, this group met monthly, hosted three community meetings, conducted a survey of 253 residents, and published the RainReady Midlothian Interim Report, an account of existing flood risk in the village. Together, we have established a shared vision for a RainReady Midlothian, summarized in this report.
CNT
Chatham, a neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side, has been susceptible to flooding since it was first developed in the 1860s. In January 2015, the Center for Neighborhood Technology (CNT), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and a group of neighborhood flood victims joined together to launch RainReady Chatham to look for solutions. This report presents the findings of our flood risk analysis and preliminary suggestions for how to fix Chatham's flooding problems.
CNT
Since September 2014, CNT and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) have been working closely with the Village of Midlothian and a variety of community and agency partners to assess the cause and characteristics of chronic urban flooding in Midlothian, a southwest suburb of Chicago. Data has been collected through a resident survey, expert analysis of existing storm sewer systems and watershed topography, a newly installed streamflow gage on Natalie Creek, as well as archived and recent precipitation data. This interim report summarizes and synthesizes these many sources of information collected to date, and begins to identify opportunities for intervention to support resilience in Midlothian.
by CNT
As storms become increasingly destructive, homes and businesses face a heightened risk of urban flooding, even when they aren’t located in formally designated floodplains. CNT’s RainReady program offers innovative, cost-effective solutions to keep properties dry and help communities stay resilient in the face of a changing climate.
by Chicago Metropolian Agency for Planning (CMAP) and CNT
In 2012, over 22 billion gallons of Lake Michigan water, worth between an estimated $64 million and $147 million, were lost to leaky, aging infrastructure. CNT and CMAP studied the water loss control techniques used by Lake Michigan water suppliers and found that over the last several years, 21% of permittees have been out of compliance with the current 8% annual water loss standard set by Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR). In addition to offering recommendations to IDNR, this report also acknowledges the challenges faced by utilities in tackling the water loss issue and provides manageable solutions specifically addressing available industry best practices.
by US EPA
The Economic Benefits of Green Infrastructure: A Case Study of Lancaster, PA offers real world evidence that green infrastructure (such as rain gardens, permeable pavement, and bioinfiltration installations) can be an effective, sustainable and budget-friendly approach to help manage stormwater in American communities. This EPA case study builds on CNT’s groundbreaking guide, The Value of Green Infrastructure, to quantify the cost savings, social benefits, and environmental advantages of Lancaster’s Green Infrastructure Plan.
by CNT
Like every other state, Georgia’s underground system of pipes is aging. But Georgia has become a leader in the national push for improved water loss control. The success of Georgia’s program provides an effective blueprint for other states and agencies in how to begin providing support to their utilities in moving forward with best practices in water loss management.
by CNT
Every day, nearly six billion gallons of expensive, treated water is simply lost. Why? Crumbling infrastructure. Leaky, aging pipes and outdated systems are wasting an estimated 14 to 18 percent of our nation’s daily water use. At the same time, water utility rates are rising. Through new research, education and awareness, technical assistance, and supportive policies, CNT is working to help utilities across the Great Lakes states adopt improved water management practices. Foreword by David B. LaFrance, Executive Director of the American Water Works Association.
by CNT
First-of-its-kind analysis that combines insurance and FEMA claims data, property owner surveys, and GIS mapping of flooding in an urban environment. Part of a first phase of research at CNT on the prevalence and cost of flooding to property owners—such as homes and businesses—in urban and suburban areas. (Updated May 2014)
by CNT, American Rivers, The Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative
The guide provides a framework for the long term and predictable implementation of green infrastructure. The concepts were developed around actual on-the-ground work done in Grand Rapids, MI and Milwaukee, WI.

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