Living in a Transit-Oriented Development Should Be an Option for Everyone

After years of lackluster growth and evidence that Houston might surpass Chicago in population, the Chicago City Council this week took a bold step in expanding its transit-oriented development (TOD) ordinance to provide infill potential for more housing near transit stops.   CNT has long been a proponent for such changes, since our research has shown that for a decade-long period (2000-2010), Chicago was the only U.S. city with a major legacy transit system that grew faster away from... Read the rest of this entry »

 

Chicago's TOD Ordinance Expansion Will Help City Grow

Growth around our transit system, commonly known as transit-oriented development (TOD), generates its biggest benefits when it includes all households and all neighborhoods. It gives residents choices for how to get around, particularly to jobs, and connects them to economic opportunity. It lowers the cost of living by making it easier for households of all incomes to live with fewer cars. It’s good for the climate with fewer cars on the road. And when it includes all types of households, it... Read the rest of this entry »

 

Why a Focus on Congestion is Flawed

A recent Texas A&M study on traffic congestion misses the point. According to the report's findings, Chicago-area commuters lose 61 hours every year due to delays costing $1,445 annually for wasted fuel and time.  Yet we should be able to live in convenient places closer to our jobs and amenities, rather than always expect a road will take us there without delay.  Sixty-one hours a year boils down to 7.3 minutes of delay per trip. Two-thirds of area commuters get to work in... Read the rest of this entry »

 

Furthering Fair Housing Through Equitable Transit-Oriented Development

New HUD Rules Emphasize Fair Housing and Better Access to Transit and Jobs   At a press conference in Chicago today, HUD Secretary Julian Castro announced new rules nationwide aimed to help cities build inclusive communities near transit and jobs, with good schools and a high quality of life. Those rules, titled Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH), ask communities receiving HUD funding to demonstrate how they are using their investments to proactively create communities... Read the rest of this entry »

 

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