Publication Library

CNT
Chatham, a neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side, has been susceptible to flooding since it was first developed in the 1860s. In January 2015, the Center for Neighborhood Technology (CNT), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and a group of neighborhood flood victims joined together to launch RainReady Chatham to look for solutions. This report presents the findings of our flood risk analysis and preliminary suggestions for how to fix Chatham's flooding problems.
CNT
Since September 2014, CNT and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) have been working closely with the Village of Midlothian and a variety of community and agency partners to assess the cause and characteristics of chronic urban flooding in Midlothian, a southwest suburb of Chicago. Data has been collected through a resident survey, expert analysis of existing storm sewer systems and watershed topography, a newly installed streamflow gage on Natalie Creek, as well as archived and recent precipitation data. This interim report summarizes and synthesizes these many sources of information collected to date, and begins to identify opportunities for intervention to support resilience in Midlothian.
by CNT
As storms become increasingly destructive, homes and businesses face a heightened risk of urban flooding, even when they aren’t located in formally designated floodplains. CNT’s RainReady program offers innovative, cost-effective solutions to keep properties dry and help communities stay resilient in the face of a changing climate.
by US EPA
The Economic Benefits of Green Infrastructure: A Case Study of Lancaster, PA offers real world evidence that green infrastructure (such as rain gardens, permeable pavement, and bioinfiltration installations) can be an effective, sustainable and budget-friendly approach to help manage stormwater in American communities. This EPA case study builds on CNT’s groundbreaking guide, The Value of Green Infrastructure, to quantify the cost savings, social benefits, and environmental advantages of Lancaster’s Green Infrastructure Plan.
by CNT, American Rivers, The Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative
The guide provides a framework for the long term and predictable implementation of green infrastructure. The concepts were developed around actual on-the-ground work done in Grand Rapids, MI and Milwaukee, WI.
by CNT
This study shows that Portland is well-positioned to pilot a tree asset management program that would lay the groundwork for turning its tree canopy into a bondable asset, similar to bridges and roads. The study identified six steps through which Portland and other cities can create a tree asset management program. The study also provides several case studies of other cities that are attempting to turn their trees into assets.
by CNT
A broad analysis that is the first to place an economic value on the numerous benefits provided by green infrastructure. Goals: 1- Inform decision-makers and planners about the multiple benefits green infrastructure delivers to communities, 2- guide communities in valuing the benefits of potential green infrastructure investments.
by CNT, lead author
Reviews current methods, tools and case studies of valuation of the economic and social benefits produced by green infrastructure practices, particularly as they are applied in urban settings.
by CNT
CNT, along with Hey and Associates Inc. (Hey), conducted research to monitor and document the performance of green infrastructure for stormwater management. The project was funded, by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5.
by CNT
The City of Fort Wayne has chosen to use several simultaneous challenges related to its water resources as an opportunity to explore sustainable solutions. CNT was retained to seek hidden assets in the urban neighborhoods and identify ways in which water resource investments can achieve multiple benefits.

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